Category Archives: open source

#opensource is not a charity

clock-with-a-questionLogging onto my laptop this morning, I have already seen two tickets opened by different people clamoring for SOMEONE to address their stackoverflow question. They appeared to want an answer to their question NOW. The humor in all this is that the issue itself is only seven hours old, with the person begging for a response when their question is barely three hours old. Sorry, but open source is not a charity.

gordonBatPhoneIf you have a critical issue, perhaps you should think about paying for support. It’s what other customers need when they want a priority channel. It definitely isn’t free as in no-cost. Something that doesn’t work is opening a ticket with nothing more than a link to your question.

question-not-answeredOpen source has swept the world. If you don’t get onboard to using it, you risk being left in the dust. But too many think that open source is free, free, FREE. That is not the case. Open source means you can access the source code. Optimally, you have the ability to tweak, edit, refine, and possibly send back patches. But nowhere in there is no-cost support.

pivotal-ossIn a company committed to open source, we focus on building relationships with various communities. The Spring Framework has grown hand over fist in adoption and driven much of how the Java community builds apps today. Pivotal Cloud Foundry frequently has other companies sending in people to pair with us. It’s a balancing act when trying to coach users to not assume their question will be answered instantly.

helpingI frequent twitter, github, stackoverflow, and other forums to try and interact with the community. If at all possible, I shoot to push something through. Many times, if we’re talking about a one-line change, it’s even easier. But at the end of the day, I have to draw a line and focus on priorities. This can irk some members not aware of everything I’m working on. That is a natural consequence.

Hopefully, as open source continues to grow, we can also mature people’s expectations between paid and un-paid support. Cheers!

P.S. For a little while longer, there is a coupon code to Learning Spring Boot for 50% off (Python Testing Cookbook as well!)

Banner (LSPT50)

How open source has commoditized computers

mac-snow-whiteAs I type this blog entry, from my wife’s newly purchased MacBook AIr, I marvel at the power of open source. Thanks to open source, we are no longer bound to a particular vendor, operation system, or anything else.

My wife’s old netbook was the last machine in this household that ran Windows. Back when we got married and lived in a smaller house, the desktop computer in the living room ran Ubuntu LInux. It took my wife little effort to learn how to drive that machine, considering she primarily used computers to browse the internet and a little bit of picture management when making Shutterfly books.

I introduced her to OpenOffice (later migrating to LibreOffice) for writing. I then threw in Dropbox and gave her her own folder to keep her own written works. With all these in place, it didn’t even take a whole day before she was up and running, editing her manuscript on the new Mac.

By moving to a handful of open source projects, the need for a particular vendor evaporated. Now we can pick a machine based on more important things like: quality, performance, and tools. I got her a maxed out 13″ MacBook Air (8GB memory , 512GB SSD disk).

Suffice it to say, she is definitely happy. You can even see the decal she just ordered up above! I have gone in and done a couple extra steps, like installing Crashplan to back things up. I am also installing Homebrew in case I need this machine as a backup development workstation. I also flipped on remote login support so I can ssh into this lightweight laptop as needed. It truly is a thing of beauty. Ahh! Goodbye Windows!