Have you crossed the midpoint in your career?

There is something that has snuck up on me. When I stopped to think about it, it became clear. There is a point in your career when you cross this “midpoint.” I remember Day One of my first job as a professional software engineer.

I had already written little scripts, apps, and other hobby projects. But this was the day I was building stuff for my livelihood. The day when I had to start steadfastly listening to others, and doing what I was told. Sounds scary, right? Well, not really. I guess I was too gung ho. And the people that hired me did a great job at hand holding. Nevertheless, what I know today and what I knew back then are starkly different.

What is the midpoint? I like to think of every person out there writing code on a spectrum. People on their first day start at the bottom. Then slowly, but surely your knowledge and experience causes you to rise. On your Day Two, there is someone else having their Day One. At a certain point, you cross the halfway mark, or the “midpoint.” Congratulations, you arguably know more than half of the other people in the your field.

This isn’t an article about arrogance, or how I’m better than you. No. This is recognizing that the things you learned in college have benefit, but we all gain new talents and experience every day. And your responsibilities change.

On Day One, your responsibility may be to test someone else’s code. (That was mine!) But at a certain point, perhaps after you’ve crossed the midpoint, your responsibility may be to help others. To teach, lead, form communities. Or to take the reins of a project where there is zero management and guidance. Those that are on Day One aren’t equipped to do that.

An honest recognition of where you “are” can make you realize that signing up to speak at a conference, hosting a JUG group, leading an open source project, or offering to run a project with little more than a single sentence for a high ranking manager in your company.

It’s also a keen time to visit places like Stack Overflow and answer questions. And remember to extend grace to those that are new and seeking to grow themselves. Some people call this giving back. I’ve never been a fan of this expression. I prefer to think of it as sharing what you have learned with others.

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