Spring Python makes final 1.0.0 release

Please read the official press release from SpringSource about this historic release of Spring Python. Please visit http://www.springsource.com/download/community in order to download a copy. NOTE: Spring Python has now been relocated to the top level, instead of being inside EXT.

  • It’s the first Spring Extension to reach live status and also progress to a stable 1.0.0 final release.
  • The trunk has been updated to allow work on next major release 1.1 to begin. This means we aren’t through, but just getting started.
  • Another branch has been created to support backporting critical fixes into the 1.0 baseline, meaning it will have the same type of strong support as other SpringSource projects.

This demonstrates that Spring Python has a nicely honed development process, committed to providing stable APIs, while also focusing on new and innovative changes. While we have worked hard since the start of this project back in 2006, we still lots of ideas and have plenty more work to do.

I wish to thank Mark Pollack, the current sponsor of Spring Python and code geek that developed Spring .NET, for coming on board quickly, and supporting me in every way possible to get this release wrapped up and pushed out for everyone to use. I also want to thank Russ Miles, former SpringSource consultant, who has supported me for over the past year with encouragement and feedback. I also thank the community for its valuable comments, questions, and suggestions that has helped steer this project in a positive direction.

Key changes used to this release include:

Improvement

  • [SESPRINGPYTHONPY-96] – When making builds, use “.” as separator between version and tag; support python 2.4/2.5/2.6

Task

  • [SESPRINGPYTHONPY-56] – Assess impact of python’s deprecation of md5 and sha modules to spring python’s security segment

3 thoughts on “Spring Python makes final 1.0.0 release

  1. Kay Schluehr

    Greg, there is something I wonder about regarding your project. I’m right now approaching Java from Python using Jython and this seems to be a more evident vector. It’s also something which doesn’t need much justification in general because that’s what Python has always been about: scripting and providing a simple, direct and succinct access to libraries/frameworks written in other languages.

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  2. gregturn

    My first love for python was the fact that many, MANY libraries originally written in C could now be wrapped with python, and accessible through this nice, higher level language. But the more you can code in pure python, the better. Consider things like Google App Engine. That is something originally available in python, before they got to java access. The deal was, you couldn’t use any of the C-extensions people had, but instead use pure python. That is why i want to move towards a pure python implementation of Spring Python. Right now, we depend on Amara, which has a C-extension in it, so we can’t run it on GAE or inside jython. There are plans to migrate off of Amara, so that we can support more platforms. If we can get to pure python, you can use it side-by-side with the Spring Framework in jython, and decide which better suits your needs. Who knows? Perhaps a mixture may be exactly what you need. I can’t make promises because every application is different. But the more choices, the better. I feel like Spring Python in jython will probably be more pythonic than Spring Framework classes. For one thing, the DatabaseTemplate is probably more succinct and less bulky than the JdbcTemplate. Using python collections is probably easier to parse than Java collections.

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  3. Kay Schluehr

    I feel like Spring Python in jython will probably be more pythonic than Spring Framework classes.For one thing, the DatabaseTemplate is probably more succinct and less bulky than the JdbcTemplate. Using python collections is probably easier to parse than Java collections.

    Python collections map directly to Java collections in Jython. If Java requires a List than passing a Python list is just adequate. The Java integration in Jython is the best part of Jython as far as I can tell.

    So I’ll take you by the word and going a bit into Java Spring + Jython for the next 3-4 weeks ( after clarifying some basics ). I’ve no prior experience with Spring, so I need to learn it while creating a small layer above Spring for Jython.

    Jython needs more showcases of what’s doable – not just running popular Python frameworks like Django which has no idea what to make of Java at all.

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